2020 Undergraduate Grant Awardees

The Duke University Center for International & Global Studies (DUCIGS) provides funding for full-time undergraduate Duke students to complement their classwork with research experience in different social and cultural settings. In the 2020 competition, ten undergraduate students received travel grants from DUCIGS. They submitted proposals for focused overseas academic research of a minimum of four weeks' duration. Their projects were designed to further their knowledge of a particular country or world region.


2020 Undergraduate Grant Awardees

Henock Asaye ('20) - Public Policy and Global Health

Project: Applied Health Theatre in Ethiopia - Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 

Sophie Almekinders ('22) - Mathematics

Project: Change-Point Detection in Time Series - Aachen, Germany

Andrew Carlins ('21) - Economics and History

Project: Jewish Identity Under the Franco and Vargas Regimes from the Late 1930s through the Mid-1950s - Jerusalem, Israel

Anne Crabill ('22) - Public Policy

Project: Investigating the Impact of Social Media on Vaccine Hesitancy - London, England

Julia Rosa Helm ('23) - Undeclared

Project: Evaluation of Prenatal Health Choices and Its Impacts on the Child in Camasca, Honduras - Camasca, Honduras

Courtney Lee ('22) - Italian and European Studies

Project: Exploring the Attitudes Towards Punishment and Justice in Italy through Artistic Representations of Dante's Inferno - Bologna, Italy

Anwulika Okonjo ('21) - International Comparative Studies

Project: When I Call Myself a Feminist: Comparative Ideological Approaches to Women's Rights and Social Change in Nigeria - Lagos, Abuja, Port Harcourt, and Enugu, Nigeria 

Alyvia Schaad ('21) - Civil Engineering

Project: Engineering Innovations to Improve Sanitation and Hygiene - Amahi, Indonesia

Mishek Thapa ('21) - Statistics

Project: Earthquake Early Warning in Nepal: Technology, Behavioral Science, and Policy - Kathmandu, Nepal

Michael Wen ('21) - Biology and Sociology 

Project: Investigating the Role of PBX in Specifying Stem Cell Position During Planarian Regeneration - Oxford, England